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History Courses

HIST 1014 Western Civilization I: Western Civilization to the Seventeenth Century
A study of the historical development of Western civilization to the seventeenth century, with special emphasis on Greece, Rome, the medieval age, and the Renaissance and Reformation movements. A chronological and political approach with appropriate attention to cultural achievements and economic characteristics of these periods. III B

HIST 1024 Western Civilization II: Western Civilization from the Seventeenth Century to the Present
A study of Western civilization from the Enlightenment to the present, with special emphasis on the Atlantic Revolutions, ideologies of the nineteenth century, industrialism, the impact of the West on other civilizations, world conflicts of the twentieth century, and problems of contemporary society. III B

HIST 1154 United States to 1865
A study and critical evaluation of the political, economic, and social forces that shaped the development of the American colonies and the United States from 1492 through the Civil War, noting the varying historical interpretations of those forces.

HIST 1164 United States From 1865
A study and critical evaluation of the fundamental forces contributing to the emergence of modern America from 1865.

HIST 2014 Shooting America: Photography, 1860-1960
An examination of visual texts that reflected, shaped, or maligned cultures, places, and people in the United States. Course participants will be expected to: 1. cultivate a theoretical framework for visual analysis in order to "read" images critically and 2. seek to understand the social, political, and personal contexts in which important bodies of photographic work were created and disseminated. Prerequisite: HIST 1164 or permission of instructor. IV

HIST 2024 Spartacus: Slaves and Gladiators
Between 73 and 71 BCE, Spartacus, a Thracian gladiator, led the largest slave revolt in the ancient world. This course examines the historical record and the myths, both ancient and modern, surrounding this great story. Special attention to slavery and the institution of gladiatorial games in the Roman world. IV;V. Also listed as HIST-2024.

HIST 2104 Medieval Europe
A study of a millennium of social experiments to mitigate, redirect, and rationalize the violent individualism of the Germanic peoples who swept into Europe after the Roman Empire crumbled. Prerequisite: HIST 1014. (Pre-Modern field) IV

HIST 2134 The Second World War: Topics & Issues
A study of the Second World War based on specific issues, geographies, or theoretical frameworks. Topics may include, but are not limited to: The war in Eastern Europe/USSR; the American home front; military campaigns; women and war; and intelligence strategies. IV

HIST 2144 Europe in the Nineteenth Century
A study of European history from the Congress of Vienna through the First World War, emphasizing the growth of nationalism, the effects of the Industrial Revolution, the development of socialist doctrines, and the rise of neoimperialism. (Modern European field) IV; V

HIST 2154 Europe in the Eighteenth Century
An examination of the major forces and events from the age of absolutism through the French Revolution. Areas of study include the political, social, and cultural effects of the Enlightenment, the development of the international European state system, Europe’s relations with the non- European world, the rise of the middle classes, and the emergence of a consumer culture. (Modern European field) IV; V

HIST 2184 The Holocaust
An in-depth historical exploration of one of the most horrendous crimes in history, the murder of six million Jews and millions of others during the Second World War. Students will examine the development of anti-Semitic thought in Western culture, the means the Nazis used to undertake the ’Final Solution,’ and Jewish experiences during the Holocaust. The course will conclude with the attempt to understand and make sense of the Holocaust in the post-Holocaust world. (Modern European field) IV

HIST 2204 Special Topics in History
The study of an era, a problem, or a commanding figure not fully treated in other courses. Topics change from term to term and are announced in advance. May be repeated for credit. CR/NC grading when used as a travel course. Prerequisite: Any TU History Course or permission of instructor. (Students may petition the program to allow Special Topics courses to fulfill history major field distribution requirements.) IV

HIST 2224 Archaic and Classical Greece
A survey of the political, social, and cultural history of ancient Greece, with emphasis on the era of the polis. (Pre-Modern field) IV

HIST 2244 The Roman Empire
A survey of Roman history from the beginnings of the principate through the late antique period (i.e., first-sixth centuries A.D.) with an emphasis on Roman political and social institutions, the definition of citizenship, and the problem of unity in a multicultural society. (Pre-Modern field) Also listed as CLA-2144. IV

HIST 2304 Pre-Modern China
An examination of Chinese history from the Shang Dynasty (c. 1500-1122 B.C.) through the Ming Dynasty (1368-1644). Special emphasis is placed on social and intellectual developments that influenced Chinese culture. (Pre-Modern field; Non-Western field) III A or IV

HIST 2374 History of Africa
A study of African history from pre-colonial times to the present. Areas of focus include Africa’s indigenous cultural, social and political developments in the pre-colonial period and the changes brought by encounters with the outside world. The course stresses the importance of history to understanding the socio-political situation in contemporary Africa. (Non-Western field) III A or IV

HIST 2404 Latin American Civilization I
Surveys Latin American civilization from its pre-Columbian beginnings to the independence movements of the early nineteenth century. Focus will be placed on the encounters among European, African, and indigenous peoples that resulted in new and changing cultures. (Non- Western field) III A or IV; V

HIST 2414 Latin American Civilization II
Surveys Latin American civilization from the period of independence to the present. Though the focus is, from time to time, placed on a particular culture, country, or region, the stress will be on the themes and movements common to Latin America as a whole. Emphasis will be placed on those aspects of the Latin American past that helped to shape and explain its present. (Non- Western field) III A or IV; V

HIST 2444 Latin American Revolutions
Revolutionary upheaval characterized Latin America throughout the twentieth century. This course examines the causes of revolutions, the motivations of those who instigated rebellions, and the impact of revolutionary activity on all groups in society. The course will focus on Mexico, Bolivia, Cuba, and Nicaragua, all countries that experienced major social upheaval, and examine cases of unsuccessful revolts in South and Central America. Students will draw out comparisons between revolutions that ’succeeded’ and those that ’failed.’ Prerequisite: HIST 1024, 1154, 1164, or permission of instructor. (Non-Western field). III A or IV

HIST 2744 Research Methods Seminar
An introduction to historical research methods, concentrating on the nature, use, evaluation, and analysis of primary sources. Students will examine a variety of primary sources, which may include memoirs, newspapers, archival documents, oral histories, and other materials. Students will also develop skills in placing sources in their proper historical context and in constructing historical arguments. Prerequisite: Any 1000-level history course. IV

HIST 3044 Global Environmental History
This course examines the history of human interaction with the natural environment, utilizing a global lens and focusing upon the period since 1492. It explores the influence of humans on the natural world and the influence of nature on human activities and choices. Themes include environmental exchange between world regions, the extent and limitations of human agency, the emergence of the environmentalist movement, and others drawn from students’ interests and research. Prerequisite: Any Transylvania University History course. IV;V

HIST 3084 England Since 1660
Study of English history from the Restoration to the present. Considerable emphasis on class discussion of key topics or problems in English history (e.g., Revolution of 1688, George III, and the Irish problem) based on outside reading. Prerequisite: HIST 1024. (Modern European field) IV; V

HIST 3124 Women in American Life and Thought
An examination of the role of women in American life and thought involving an analysis of the changing roles of women from the colonial era to the present. Focus on the varieties of women’s experiences at every level of social life, in the professions, and in the family, as well as women’s struggle for suffrage and equal rights. Prerequisite: HIST 1154 or WS 1004. Also listed as WS 3124. (U.S. field) IV; V

HIST 3144 Gender in European History
Investigates how understandings of gender have affected European women and men from the Enlightenment to the contemporary era. Topics covered may include the relationship of gender to the revolution, industrialization, imperialism, totalitarianism, and total war, as well as the role of gender in everyday life. Prerequisite: HIST 1024, 2144, 2154, WS 1004, or permission of instructor. Also listed as WS 3144 (Modern European field) IV

HIST 3154 Recent American History
An examination of the major forces that have shaped contemporary America. Set against the backdrop of Cold War political culture, the course will focus on such topics as the Vietnam War, Watergate, civil rights movements, and identity politics. Prerequisite: HIST 1164. (U.S. field) IV; V

HIST 3204 Special Topics in History
The advanced study of an era, a problem, or a commanding figure not fully treated in other courses. Topics change from term to term and are announced in advance. May be repeated for credit. CR/NC grading when used as a travel course. Prerequisite: Established by the individual instructor each time the course is offered. (Students may petition the program to allow Special Topics courses to fulfill history major field distribution requirements.) IV

HIST 3224 Diplomacy & War in Antiquity
Aims to provide a richer understanding of how political differences were settled in antiquity, with a view to ascertaining which problems and solutions are relevant only to the context of their time, and which might be instructive to us in the present. Prerequisite: HIST 1014 or permission of instructor. (Pre-Modern field) IV

HIST 3244 Julius Caesar
Julius Caesar is a pivotal figure, particularly significant for Americans because he represents a realized alternative to a republican government, and a study of his rise to supreme authority is an object lesson in the destabilizing and perversion of a constitution. Even so, he was a truly dramatic figure, with his great virtue, his clemency, being his tragic flaw. This course will illuminate the context and method of Caesar’s rise to power. Prerequisite: HIST 1014 or permission of instructor. (Pre-Modern field) IV

HIST 3304 Emergence of Modern America 1893-1920
An examination of the major intellectual, cultural, political, social, and economic forces that shaped modern America. Set against the backdrop of industrialism, urbanization, and western settlement, the course will focus on such topics as large-scale immigration, reform efforts, the fight for women’s suffrage, the rise of professionalism, and the expanding role of the United States in foreign affairs. Prerequisite: HIST 1164 or permission of instructor. (U.S. field) IV; V

HIST 3324 Colonial America: 1565-1787
An examination and critical evaluation of the cultural, social, political, and economic forces that shaped the area which became the United States. Particular attention will be given to the relationships between Europeans, Africans, and Native Americans; the role of the wilderness and frontier in American culture; and the colonists’ use of republican ideology. The course will also focus on a variety of historical interpretations/perspectives. Prerequisite: HIST 1154. (U.S. field) IV; V

HIST 3344 The New Nation: 1787-1861
A critical evaluation of the cultural, social, political, and economic forces that shaped the United States in its early years as a nation. Particular attention will be given to the development of a political party system, the rise of industrialism, the variety of settlement patterns by Americans, and the roles of race/class/gender relations in forming national identity. This course will also focus on diverse historical interpretations and perspectives. Prerequisite: HIST 1154 (U.S. field) IV; V

HIST 3404 Europe, 1914-1945
A study of Europe during and between the two world wars, focusing on political, social, military, and cultural issues. Special emphasis is placed on the concept of total war and its effect on political and social institutions. Other topics include the Russian Revolution, the rise of Fascism and Nazism, the crisis of democracy and the approach of World War II, and Europe’s relations with the non-European world. Prerequisite: HIST 1024. (Modern European field) IV; V

HIST 3414 The Contemporary World, 1945 to the Present
A study of the forces that have shaped the world since 1945, including the Cold War, decolonization and neo-colonialism, the rise of emerging nations in Africa, Asia, and the Middle East, the collapse of communism in Europe, and the growth of globalization. Prerequisite: HIST 1024. (Modern European field) IV; V

HIST 3424 United States - Latin American Relations
Examines the relations between the United States, Latin America and the Caribbean and their development from the mid-nineteenth century to the present. This course concentrates on the experiences of some of the countries with the closest experience of American power, such as Haiti and Guatemala, but it also takes into account the history of the entire region’s relationship with the U.S., including the importance of large-scale migration. Prerequisite: HIST 1164, 2404, 2414, 3444, or 3454. IV

HIST 3464 Modern German History
A survey of German political and social history from 1848 to the present. Main topics include nationalism and the formation of the German state, German experiences in the two world wars and the efforts to build democracy in the context of military defeat, the rise of Nazism, and the dilemmas posed by re-unification at the end of the Cold War. Prerequisite: HIST 1024. (Modern European field) IV; V

HIST 3554 History of Imperial Russia
An examination of autocracy, bureaucracy, and serfdom in Imperial Russia. Focus is on the attempts to modernize the empire in the nineteenth century, the revolutionary movements from Decembrism to Leninism, the era of ’Great Reforms,’ and the critical role of the intelligentsia. Concludes with the revolution of 1905 and the events leading to 1917. Prerequisite: HIST 1014 or 1024. (Modern European field) IV; V

HIST 3564 History of the Soviet Union
An examination of the February and Bolshevik revolutions, the rule of Lenin and Stalin, collectivization, the purges, the Nazi-Soviet pact, World War II, and de-Stalinization. Prerequisite: HIST 1024. (Modern European field) IV; V

HIST 3624 From Alexander to Cleopatra
An exploration of the Greek and Roman experience during the period 336-31 B.C. Its primary objective is to examine the interplay between cultures in a historical context. Topics for discussion include the creation of identity, patterns of cultural assimilation, equity within and between societies, civil-military relations, and the use and abuse of propaganda. Prerequisite: HIST 1014. (Pre-Modern field) IV; V

HIST 4194 Historical Methodology
A study of the basic methods and tools of historical research and the techniques of writing effective research papers. Discussion of current issues in the study of history. Prerequisites: HIST 1014, 1024, 1154, and 1164. IV

HIST 4204 Internship in History
A program offering supervised placement in organizations providing experience in use, dissemination, or administration of historical materials and information. The student chooses an appropriate organization in consultation with the internship supervisor. (1 or 2 course units.) CR/NC grading. Prerequisites: Junior or senior standing, history major, and permission of instructor. A total of 2 course units may be counted toward the major.

HIST 4208 Internship in History
A program offering supervised placement in organizations providing experience in use, dissemination, or administration of historical materials and information. The student chooses an appropriate organization in consultation with the internship supervisor. (1 or 2 course units.) CR/NC grading. Prerequisites: Junior or senior standing, history major, and permission of instructor. A total of 2 course units may be counted toward the major.

HIST 4444 Senior Research Seminar
An extensive study of a period of history, culminating in a research paper or a bibliographic essay. May be repeated an indefinite number of times provided the topic is different. Prerequisite: HIST 4194 or permission of the instructor. IV

HIST 4904 Senior Honors
Provides an opportunity for the qualified history major to do independent work in the field under the supervision of a faculty member. A senior who has taken 7 courses in history and who has a 3.0 grade point average overall and in major courses may apply to enter the program by submitting a project proposal and securing permission of the faculty. Students may receive credit for either 1 or 2 course units, depending on the project, but they may not receive credit for more than 1 course unit per term.

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