Home

Academic Programs

program

photo

WRC Courses

WRC 1004 Introduction to Communication
Focuses on the ways we utilize communication in everyday interactions, including interpersonal communication, organizational communication, and persuasion. Both linguistic and nonverbal forms will be analyzed. Only open to first-year students and sophomores.

WRC 1034 Public Speaking
A study of the selection, organization, preparation, and presentation of public address. Develops research skills, as well as skills in verbal and non-verbal communication of messages. Standard or CR/NC grading.

WRC 1044 Confident Writing
Concentrates on basic skills of grammar style, and mechanics. Includes practice in defining a topic, refining a thesis, organizing, developing, and editing academic essays.

WRC 1054 Introduction to Journalism
Instruction and practice in writing news and feature material, with attention to journalism ethics, editorial writing, and the practices of gathering and evaluating news.

WRC 1064 Argumentation and Debate
The study of the structure and presentation of arguments, focusing on the utilization of argumentation techniques in debate settings. Students develop skills in researching, evaluating, and using evidence in support of claims. The class focuses on the development of cases, refutation, strategies and practice, effective reasoning, and quaulity presentation of one’s own arguments and one’s rebuttals to the claims of others.

WRC 1071 Speech Practicum
Instruction and practice in competitive forensics. Students will compete in debate and/or individual events (possible categories include interpretation, limited preparation, and public speaking events). Students must take part in at least one tournament for credit. May be repeated 3 times.

WRC 1112 Writing Laboratory
Concentrates on basic skills and forms of expository writing, emphasizing paragraphs and short essays. May be required of students whose writing, in the judgment of the First Year Seminar faculty, requires further attention beyond that available in FYS 1004 and 1104. May also be required of an upperclass student on the recommendation of an instructor, program director, or adviser. Admission of these students will require concurrence with the director of the Writing Center. Any student who registers for this course must complete it satisfactorily to graduate. There is no overload fee for enrollment in this course. (1/2 course unit.) CR/NC grading.

WRC 2001 Writing, Rhetoric, and Comm. Practicum
Instruction and practice in writing, rhetoric, and communication. Specific content of the practicum will depend on the course designation and student need. Possible examples include Writing Center consultant training in pedagogical theory, publications instruction, and mass media involvement. (1/4 unit of credit.) May accumulate up to 1 unit of credit in practicum experiences. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor or department chair.

WRC 2002 Writing, Rhetoric, & Comm Practicum
Instruction and practice in writing, rhetoric, and communication. Specific content of the practicum will depend on the course designation and student need. Possible examples include Writing Center consultant training in pedagogical theory, publications instruction, and mass media involvement. (1/2 units of credit.) May accumulate up to 1 unit of credit in practicum experiences. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor or department chair.

WRC 2003 Writing, Rhetoric, & Comm Practicum
Instruction and practice in writing, rhetoric, and communication. Specific content of the practicum will depend on the course designation and student need. Possible examples include Writing Center consultant training in pedagogical theory, publications instruction, and mass media involvement. (3/4 course unit.) May accumulate up to 1 unit of credit in practicum experiences. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor or department chair.

WRC 2004 Writ, Rhet, & Comm Practicum
Instruction and practice in writing, rhetoric, and communication. Specific content of the practicum will depend on the course designation and student need. Possible examples include Writing Center consultant training in pedagogical theory, publications instruction, and mass media involvement. (1 unit of credit.) May accumulate up to 1 unit of credit in practicum experiences. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor or department chair.

WRC 2012 Writing Center Theory and Practice
Writing Center theory draws upon movements in rhetoric, composition studies, digital literacy, education, social science (especially sociology and psychology), philosophy, gender studies, and literary theory. Although an important goal of this class is to help prepare students to serve as peer-based writing consultants, its primary goal is to help participants develop a working knowledge of writing history, theory, and pedagogy - a field of study that can be applied to both academic and professional environments. Participants will use readings, group activities, and observations to help develop a sense of their own writing process. Instructor consent required. Suggested perquisites: FYS and FYRS.

WRC 2014 Oral Interpretation of Literature
A study of the way writers communicate meaning through action, character, figurative language, period, and setting, and the methods by which an oral interpreter might express those elements vocally and visually in a performance program unified by an original theme. Literary analysis and performance technique is practiced with selections in poetry, prose, drama, and various combinations. Participation in a Speech Meet is required. Prerequsite: Any WRC or English course. IV

WRC 2054 Intercultural Communication
The study of the ways both macro-culture and micro-culture shape us as communicators, and the methods for enhancing interaction across these differences. Analysis of both verbal and non-verbal communication styles, with an interest in interpersonal, organizational, and governmental interactions. IV; V

WRC 2074 Fiction Workshop
An introductory study of the conventions that shape fiction combined with extensive practice in using these conventions. Conducted as a workshop, the course will involve regular writing and discussion of the work produced by the student writers themselves. Students wishing to enroll must present satisfactory evidence of motivation and serious interest in creative writing. Standard or CR/NC grading. IV

WRC 2084 Poetry Workshop
An introductory study of the conventions that shape lyric poetry combined with extensive practice in using these conventions. Conducted as a workshop, the course will involve regular writing and discussion of the work produced by the student writers themselves. Students wishing to enroll must present satisfactory evidence of motivation and serious interest in creative writing. May be repeated for credit as long as the topic is different. Standard or CR/NC grading. IV

WRC 2114 Interpersonal Communication
A study of the kind of contact that occurs when the people communicating with each other talk and listen in ways that increase and enhance personal understanding. Topics to be considered include the importance of, and methods for enhancing one’s perceptions, listening skills, emotional awareness, identity and impression management, verbal and nonverbal expression, conflict management and resolution, and building relationships within and across cultures. Prerequisite: Sophomore Standing or permission of instructor. IV

WRC 2214 Business Writing
Designed to help students develop skills in writing, especially for business and industry, where writing is important and inevitable. Students will read about and research current topics in business writing, view and analyze sample business documents, and produce many types of texts (including email, memo, resume, cover letter, reports, etc.) using various media (oral, print, and online) for a variety of purposes and audiences common in business writing. IV

WRC 2264 Non-Fiction Workshop
An introductory study of the conventions that shape literary non-fiction with extensive practice in using these conventions. Conducted as a workshop, the course will involve regular writing and discussion of the work produced by student writers themselves. Students wishing to enroll must present satisfactory evidence of motivation and serious interest in creative writing. May be repeated for credit as long as the topic is different. Standard or CR/NC grading. Also listed as ENG 2264. IV

WRC 2294 Special Topics in Writing, Rhetoric, and Communication
Introduction to selected topics in communication focusing on concepts and methods used by communication scholars. Potential topics include listening, communication and gender, crosscultural communication, and rhetorical theory. May be repeated for credit as long as the topic is different. IV

WRC 2314 Writing for Writing’s Sake
Brings writers together for the pleasure of reading and talking about writing (not to mention the joy of actually devoting time to doing it). This course examines the writing life and offers writers a chance to do what they love to do. Students will write and share, and will polish a portion of their writing for the purpose of compiling an end-of-term collection of the workshop’s best and most interesting efforts. IV

WRC 2334 Rhetoric of Resistance
After a brief overview of some key rhetorical principles, this course will examine the practicesand strategies used by individuals, groups,and movements who have challenged and are challenging concentrated interests of power. Examines a wide variety of rhetorical texts,including but not limited to newspaper articles,underground pamphlets, songs, films, autobiographies, photographs,human rights reports, performances, speeches, and books. In addition to reading/viewing these texts, this course will consist of short writing assignments, presentations, and a final project. Interdisciplinary course appropriate for those interested in the fields of rhetoric, composition, communication, political science, history, philosophy, and women’s studies. IV

WRC 2354 Introduction to Classical Rhetoric
An introduction to the art of rhetoric-a discipline concerned, as Aristotle writes, with "observing in any case the available means of persuasion." Via close reading, short response papers, group discussions, and a project that employs both a written and spoken component, participants will not only develop a working vocabulary of some of the terms and techniques associated with classical rhetoric but also have ample opportunities to see how such elements function in contemporary texts. Helpful for anyone interested in writing successful arguments regardless of academic discipline. Prerequisite: FYS 1004 and 1104. IV; V

WRC 3024 Nonverbal Communication
The study of the way we communicate without and beyond words. The various types of nonverbal behavior, including body language, gestures, paralanguage,space utilization,etc. will be examined in order to increase understanding of intracultural and cross-cultural communication. Prerequisite: WRC 1004 or permission of instructor. IV; V

WRC 3034 Organizational Communication
The study of the ways in which communication affects organizations. Uses Organizational Theory to focus on concepts of group work, leadership, motivation, formal and informal systems, external and internal audiences, organizational technologies, and interpersonal communication in organizations. Stidemts complete practical application through analysis of a particular organization. Prerequisite: WRC 1004 or permissionof instructor. IV; V

WRC 3044 Gender and Communication
The study of the role communication plays in the socialization of gender and the role gender plays in communication. Focus on relational interaction in interpersonal, educational, familiy and organization contexts, on mass media messages, and on issues of power and critique. Also listed as WS 3044. Prerequisite: WRC 1004, WS 1004, or permission of instructor. IV; V

WRC 3054 Digital Rhetoric
The study of theories of rhetoric in digital spaces and of our relationships to various digital tools and environments. Topics include audio and video composing, issues of access, shifting concerns of copyright, and exploration of necessary updates or expansions to traditional rhetorical theories. Students will consume and produce texts in a variety of genres and modes in order to study what it means to be rhetorically effective in the 21st century. Prerequisite: FYS 1004 and 1104. IV

WRC 3064 Persuasion
The study of persuasion, with an emphasis on the receiver’s role. Focus on critical analysis of persuasive messages. Develop understanding of persuasion theory as it relates to individuals, groups, and movements. Focus particulary on the persuasive tools of social proof, reciprocity, authority, scarcity, liking, and commitment and commitment and consistency. Prerequisite: WRC 1004 or permission of instructor. IV; V

WRC 3124 The Art of Persuasive Writing
A study of, and guided practice in, non-fiction writing that builds arguments on topics of social and cultural importance. For upper-level students of all majors, this course focuses on the skills needed for communicating disciplinary knowledge effectively within both academic and civic settings. Students examine a selection of classic essays as well as some good contemporary writing from journals such as Harper’s and Atlantic Monthly. Students will be guided toward building essays on topics of their own choosing that use logical and rhetorical strategies in clean, well organized prose. Prerequisite: Junior standing. IV

WRC 3234 Feminist Rhetorics
Aristotle is commonly referred to as the father of rhetoric, but what about rhetoric’s mothers-not to mention daughters, sisters, girlfriends, aunts? Women’s voices were long excluded or erased from the recording or telling of histories of rhetoric, but feminist rhetorical scholars have sought to re(dis)cover these women’s voices and to retell their stories. And more recently, feminist rhetorical scholars have pushed at the boundaries of gender and looked to explore what role feminist rhetorics might play in an increasingly digital and transnational world. This course considers a range of historical and contemporary views of feminist rhetorics-including texts from/about women and feminist rhetors as well as key texts about the development of the field-and asks students to contribute their own voices and scholarly work to these ongoing conversations. Prerequisite: FYS 1104. Also listed as WS 3234. IV

WRC 3294 Special Topics in Writing, Rhetoric, and Communication
Advanced study of selected topics in writing, rhetoric, and/or communication focusing on concepts and methods utilized by scholars in the field. May be repeated for credit as long as the topic is different. IV

WRC 3354 Readings in Rhetorical Criticism
Designed for students who are interested in argumentation/persuasion, critical theory, and/or cultural studies. Students will be introduced to various schools of rhetorical criticism/methodology(such as feminist, ideological, pentadic, and narrative based approaches) and will read a variety of rhetorical scholars (such as Bakhtin, Richards, Burke, Foucault, and Gates). Prerequisites: FYS 1004, 1104 and WRC 2354 or any 2000-level WRC course or permission of instructor. IV; V

WRC 4204 Internship in Writing, Rhetoric, and Communication
A program offering the student supervised placement in organizations providing or requiring communication services. Students might work in human resources, broadcasting, research, or other communication-related areas. Provides an opportunity to work in a professional area of the field and apply concepts learned in other communication and communication-related courses. CR/NC grading. Prerequisites: WRC 3034, 3064 and permission of instructor.

WRC 4244 Directed Study in Writing, Rhetoric and Communication
Individual student reading and research in a selected area of writing, rhetoric, and/or communication. Allows students to supplement their study of WRC in areas not covered by existing course offerings. The project must be approved by the WRC program director as well as the student’s academic advisor prior to registration. The appropriate faculty member in the program will supervise the directed study. Prerequisites: 4 WRC courses and permission of instructor.

WRC 4294 Advanced Studies in Writing, Rhetoric And Communication
Provides students with an examination of significant issues at the forefront of theory and research in writing, rhetoric, and/or communication. Includes an overview of current research in the field(s) of choice, emphasizing theoretical and methodological issues. Designed primarily to encourage students to engage more deeply with questions that arise from their study of WRC and to provide an occasion for reflection on the work students have done in other courses in the field. The course includes an independent, advanced research project, the topic of which will be chosen in close consultation with the instructor. Prerequisites: 4 WRC courses and permission of instructor.

WRC 4444 Sr Sem: Writing Rhetoric & Communication
Provides students with an examination of significant issues at the forefront of theory and research in writing, rhetoric, and/or communication. Includes an overview of current research in the field(s) of choice, emphasizing theoretical and methodological issues. Designed primarily to encourage students to engage more deeply with questions that arise from their study of WRC and to provide an occasion for reflection on the work students have done in other courses in the field. The course includes an independent, advanced research project, the topic of which will be chosen in close consultation with the instructor. Prerequisite: 4 WRC courses and permission of instructor. IV

Contact Us | Maps & Directions | Feedback | © 2003-2014 Transylvania University. All rights reserved.

Transylvania University admits students regardless of age, race, color, ethnicity, religion, gender, sexual orientation, disability, veteran status, national origin, or any other classification protected by federal or state law or local ordinance.